FAQ

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Trash bucket vs Sediment bucket
by Ericsons on 

Owners are often getting the wrong type of strainer at the outlets of a trench drain.  Trench drains often collect two different types of debris.  The first is sediment.  Sediment is heavy solids that do not float.  This typically includes things like sand, gravels, metal shavings, etc.  The second type of debris that is found in a trench drain is light floating debris.  This might be anything from peanut hulls at a ball field to bottle caps in a factory.

If a trench drain catch basin is being used to catch heavy solids a sediment bucket is best.  These are solid at the bottom and allow the water to slow inside them and deposit the heavy solids in the bottom of the basket while the water rises in the basket and spills over the top and into the outlet point.
If a trench drain catch basin is used to catch floating objects a trash bucket is best.  These are perforated mesh baskets that allow the water to pass through while screening off the larger floating objects.  DuraTrench offers these trash baskets in various mesh sizes depending on what size particulate you are trying to catch.  The most common sizes of baskets use 1/8" holes or 1/4" holes.  Note that if the holes are made smaller than they need to be you will find the basket clogging up and then the entire trench drain will back up with water and not function properly.

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Trench grate inflow
by Ericsons on 

We often get asked about the inflow capacity of a particular trench drain grate.  While this is a valid question and concern, the reality is that the grate inflow is rarely the limiting factor on a trench drain design.  The trench drain grates typically have more open area than the channel and outlet pipe can possibly carry.  If flow is a concern, the first things that need to be evaluated are the size of the outflow pipe, trench slope, and trench drain internal width.


On short runs of trench or trench grates with small openings the trench grate inflow can be verified with the following formula:
Q = 448.2 * Cd * A * (2*g*h)0.5
where Q = flow rate (gpm), Cd = discharge coefficient (0.6 typically assumed), A = open area of grate, g = gravitational acceleration (32 ft/sec/sec), h = head above grate (in).

Note the primary inflow factors are the open area of the trench grate and the head or amount of water above the grate.  In most applications the head will be minimal (1/8" is typically assumed).

This site has a spreadsheet that performs the calculations for you based on the selected grate against the head pressure.  If you need help properly evaluating the trench grate inflow feel free to contact us for assistance.

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Buy America Requirements
by Ericsons on 

Do your products meet the "Buy America" requirements?

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Radius slotted drains
by Ericsons on 

Can you make slotted pipe drains in a radius?  If so, how tight of a radius can be made?

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Slot pipe inflow
by Ericsons on 

How do you determine the inflow capacity of a slotted drain?

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Lead Time on Custom Sloping Drain
by Ericsons on 

What is the lead time to produce a trench with a custom slope?

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Trench drain slopes offered
by Robert on 

W hat slopes are offered for the Dura-Trench family of products?

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